Tag: stroke

Even one cigarette a day can still kill you, study finds

Even one cigarette a day can still kill you, study finds

If you think having just one cigarette a day won’t do any harm, you’re wrong. British researchers say lighting up just once a day was linked to a much higher risk of heart disease and stroke than might be expected.

The bottom line: “No safe level of smoking exists for cardiovascular disease,” wrote the team led by Allan Hacksaw, of UCL Cancer Institute at University College, London.

“Smokers should quit instead of cutting down, using appropriate cessation aids if needed, to significantly reduce their risk,” the study authors said.

And it’s a warning to the young that even so-called “light” smoking carries a heavy price, one expert said.

Young adults “often smoke lesser amounts than older adults,” noted Patricia Folan, who directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health, in Great Neck, N.Y.

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How stress causes heart attacks and strokes

How stress causes heart attacks and strokes

The reason why stress causes heart attacks and strokes may finally have been discovered by scientists, leading to hopes that it could be prevented.

For years experts have puzzled as to how chronic anxiety leads to heart problems.

But now scientists have found that people who have heightened activity in a part of the brain linked to stress – the amygdala – are more likely to develop cardiovascular events.

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Stress and Heart Attack link explained

Stress and Heart Attack link explained

Scientists said Sunday they may have unravelled how chronic stress leads to heart attack and stroke: triggering overproduction of disease-fighting white blood cells which can be harmful in excess.

Surplus cells clump together on the inner walls of arteries, restricting blood flow and encouraging the formation of clots that block circulation or break off and travel to another part of the body.

White blood cells “are important to fight infection and healing, but if you have too many of them, or they are in the wrong place, they can be harmful,” said study co-author Matthias Nahrendorf of the Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Doctors have long known that chronic stress leads to cardiovascular disease, but have not understood the mechanism.

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